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91
Conduct & Design Discussion / Re: How to Tutorial
« Last post by De-Legro on January 02, 2018, 12:09:03 AM »
The whole achievement-as-a-tutorial concept is wonderful. After questioning fellow players in hundreds of games of every genre and UI-style over the years, the most well-received and respected tutorials were nearly always that of nonscripted ie open-ended tutorials. Guided by a series of achievements with associated tooltips that follow a logical step-by-step process, or an achievement Tree that branches out into different activities, this method allows players to learn the ropes at their own rate, while amassing and keeping track of minor accolades. (which do bring some weird pleasure to some, including myself, for entirely unknown reasons).

For example, Medieval Engineers. Their newest system is more comprehensive, however, now split into a Tech Tree where you do a little tutorial mission where you test out every new major block/item/tool and unlock it as a result, leading up to you actually knowing wtf to do with the more complex and dynamic components and items.


Step 1 is usually thus "go to x location (first time, teaching you HOW to do so, what buttons to press, little tips on what to do and not do for optimal performance), then "gather x number of materials A B and C" (helping you learn to identify different natural flora/fauna/geography in the process!) or "Access panel/button/UI/hotbar X via Y to proceed to Z" so you know where to go, what to do, how to do it, what you need to achieve it, and then, most importantly, what you can do/make/achieve as a result.

In this case, first you just do the basics like gather rocks and make a campfire, or gather stone/flint+sticks from x y or z natural resource (berry bushes, saplings, etc) to make your first tool, a stone axe. Then you start the one where you equip said axe via a tooltip that explains how to use and cycle thru the ever-useful hotbar, then use it to cut down a tree, then cut that into logs and scraps, then make your first crafting table, all the way down to how to find natural ore veins, up to cooking logs to make charcoal for fires and steel, and later even advanced engineering processes and logic of the physics system, because no one likes it when your fancy new windmill collapses because your rickety stone tower topped off the side of a mountain because the game just expects you to know everything magically.


Great, so now explain in the context of a massively multiplayer RPG, where the bulk of actions either require access to settlements which you may or may not have at the beginning, access to certain buildings which again you may or may not have, or the interaction of other players, how all that is going to work in a time sensitive manner?


If you want people to be able to quickly access the various parts of the game then you need a environment for them to do so. We can't expect they will get that within the game world, thus the concept of having a separate tutorial area where the game can provide the needed access and resources.


The trick would be forming it in such a way that it is not just a single scripted start of the game thing, but something you can access at need.



92
Conduct & Design Discussion / Re: How to Tutorial
« Last post by Ehndras on January 01, 2018, 11:48:55 PM »
The whole achievement-as-a-tutorial concept is wonderful. After questioning fellow players in hundreds of games of every genre and UI-style over the years, the most well-received and respected tutorials were nearly always that of nonscripted ie open-ended tutorials. Guided by a series of achievements with associated tooltips that follow a logical step-by-step process, or an achievement Tree that branches out into different activities, this method allows players to learn the ropes at their own rate, while amassing and keeping track of minor accolades. (which do bring some weird pleasure to some, including myself, for entirely unknown reasons).

For example, Medieval Engineers. Their newest system is more comprehensive, however, now split into a Tech Tree where you do a little tutorial mission where you test out every new major block/item/tool and unlock it as a result, leading up to you actually knowing wtf to do with the more complex and dynamic components and items.


Step 1 is usually thus "go to x location (first time, teaching you HOW to do so, what buttons to press, little tips on what to do and not do for optimal performance), then "gather x number of materials A B and C" (helping you learn to identify different natural flora/fauna/geography in the process!) or "Access panel/button/UI/hotbar X via Y to proceed to Z" so you know where to go, what to do, how to do it, what you need to achieve it, and then, most importantly, what you can do/make/achieve as a result.

In this case, first you just do the basics like gather rocks and make a campfire, or gather stone/flint+sticks from x y or z natural resource (berry bushes, saplings, etc) to make your first tool, a stone axe. Then you start the one where you equip said axe via a tooltip that explains how to use and cycle thru the ever-useful hotbar, then use it to cut down a tree, then cut that into logs and scraps, then make your first crafting table, all the way down to how to find natural ore veins, up to cooking logs to make charcoal for fires and steel, and later even advanced engineering processes and logic of the physics system, because no one likes it when your fancy new windmill collapses because your rickety stone tower topped off the side of a mountain because the game just expects you to know everything magically.
93
Conduct & Design Discussion / Re: New Permission System Design
« Last post by Ehndras on January 01, 2018, 11:18:13 PM »
Cipheron nailed it.
94
Stories to tell / Re: The Awakening
« Last post by Alumaani on December 28, 2017, 04:35:25 PM »
As he slept,  he dreamed.

Not peaceful dreams of a comfortable slumber but dreams of terror, of violent storms and reeling ships, the loss of his father on their fateful voyage to the new world and the clash of steel, the rivers of blood and flames of conquest that forged a kingdom in that new land.

He re-lived the days of Rathgar, their march south into the lands of the Empire, their glorious crusade to stifle the encroaching masses of the southern gentiles.  A united Rathgar, a glorious ripple in the eternal life he had lived which filled his chest with the warmth of pride and brought tears to his eyes as slept.  They had conquered.

He dreamed of betrayal, Rathgar devoured from within, lives stolen from his line and his humans slaughtered in their hundreds.  He stood once again on the mountain of the bear, watching as his villages burned.  The spirit of the bear appearing to him and his allies, urging them forward, the clans of Sky, Stonedman and the Alumaani, the saviours of Rathgar.

He stood once again on the fields of battle, a cataclysmic conflict that shook the bowels of the earth and saw the northmen die in their thousands.  Entire generations of humans wiped from the world and First Ones falling in their dozens, thousands of years of knowledge blinked out in a mere moment of time.  Unspeakable tortures, oaths broken and his nemesis Tan De Serra laughing over the bodies of his Kin.

His spear trailed blood and flame as it tore through the lines of never ending foe, he carried the Luin Letchar, the spear of the sun and it burned as it passed through the bodies of his enemies.  A madness overcoming him, a rage boiling up once more, revenge was close, victory assured, his body tensed as his mind wandered in this dream of remembrance and he drew closer to the standard of their king.  He would have the revenge that had evaded him in life, here now, in this dream.  He would behead the snake, leave his body to the worms and then turn his attention to his generals.

Then the picture shifted and the banners of his foe flew away from him, his enemy from his reach, just as they had retreated from him in life, they now moved beyond his grasp and his revenge was yet again un fulfilled.

He stood alone in the darkness of his mind.

Not alone…”wake up” the voice whispered in his ear.  “It is time for you to rise again”.

Belemont Alumaani opened an eye, slowly, persistently, as the fluids of decades had sealed tight his lids and the light of the future blinded his retina, the skin slowly parted.

His memories flooded into his brain along with the long lost light of the sun.  War.

His enemies had been crushed but in victory he faced the loss of his consciousness, his ability to protect his own.  His family were all dead now, he felt their loss like a chasm in his heart, he had not been there to protect them.

A new age dawned...new plans and a new purpose.
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Conduct & Design Discussion / Re: The 1.1 Update Topic
« Last post by Andrew on December 24, 2017, 08:27:29 AM »
For the curious, I've moved into the "hammer the bugs" stage of development, alternatively known as the "you forgot WHAT!?" stage. In other words, I'm very near to actually being able to show something for my work these last few months.
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Realms Chat / Re: Suddenly, I inherit half a continent
« Last post by Ehndras on December 19, 2017, 02:15:31 AM »
Suddenly, hes slumbered again.  :-*


Too much of a headache to deal with. Figured it best to let nature sort itself out.
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So, not something you'd be interested in seeing then?


Not personally, but experience should tell that I am not a great candidate for determining what the majority might like.
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Conduct & Design Discussion / Re: Convenience tweak for players from different timezones
« Last post by Andrew on December 17, 2017, 12:15:01 PM »
So, not something you'd be interested in seeing then?
99

On a different note, De-Legro, if you do the time swap in javascript, you can have it grab the user's timezone info from the local machine rather than have to figure it out server side. Nothing says we couldn't grab that through registration though, much how forums do these days. If there's an easy way to have it convert to local time before page generation, having a method for it wouldn't be bad as we'd not need to duplicate code elsewhere, though we could do that in Javascript through the twig implementation.



Yup I noted that advantage.


There are ways however of extracting the time offset from the client and sending that back to the server, for example this explains a way to do it using cookies


http://prideparrot.com/blog/archive/2011/9/how_to_display_dates_and_times_in_clients_timezone


If we had reasons/advantages to knowing this data at the server that would be ideal.




I should note that if we want to use real time ETA updates though, you would want to encapsulate at least some of that in javascript, as it makes no sense to tie up a websocket or a make frequent ajax request just to update a clock.


I've been looking for ways to encourage people to subscribe, and making it so subscribers can see the hours, or minutes even, remaining on these things might not be a bad idea. It doesn't restrict information from free players, but rewards subscribers.

This reminds me of the Travian/Tribal War style games and how they would unlock a much better interface with proper management pages if you paid a monthly fee. Don't know how other people feel about such things but it pissed me off enough that I never purchased anything from those style games.
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Conduct & Design Discussion / Re: Convenience tweak for players from different timezones
« Last post by Andrew on December 17, 2017, 11:14:49 AM »
So, as it stands, every action that blocks travel, to include traveling, shows up on the character list now. That's a 266% increase over the number of things displayed there since I took over.

I've been looking for ways to encourage people to subscribe, and making it so subscribers can see the hours, or minutes even, remaining on these things might not be a bad idea. It doesn't restrict information from free players, but rewards subscribers.

On a different note, De-Legro, if you do the time swap in javascript, you can have it grab the user's timezone info from the local machine rather than have to figure it out server side. Nothing says we couldn't grab that through registration though, much how forums do these days. If there's an easy way to have it convert to local time before page generation, having a method for it wouldn't be bad as we'd not need to duplicate code elsewhere, though we could do that in Javascript through the twig implementation.

Alternatively, displaying in days/hours/minutes wouldn't be bad either. I'd have to look at how long the actions processing actually takes though and see if we can bring that down to once every few minutes rather than every 15 as it is now.
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